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Geumjeongsanseong (literally Geungjeong Mountain Fortress or Geumjeong Fortress) is the largest mountain fortress in the Republic of Korea today. It is located on Geumjeongsan in the Busan Metropolitan City.

Following the Japanese invasion of 1592 and the Manchu invasion in 1627 and again in 1637, awareness of the necessity of national defence was heightened, especially against attacks from the sea. As a result of this awareness, this fortress was built in the 29th year (1703) of the reign of King Sukjong. The inner and the outer walls were mainly built of natural stones, but weak portions were reinforced with artificially worked square stone blocks. The walls are about 17 kilometers in length and from 1.5 meters to 3 meters in height. The area surrounded by the fortress is about 8.2 square kilometers.

Geumjeongsanseong (literally Geungjeong Mountain Fortress or Geumjeong Fortress) is the largest mountain fortress in the Republic of Korea today. It is located on Geumjeongsan in the Busan Metropolitan City.

Following the Japanese invasion of 1592 and the Manchu invasion in 1627 and again in 1637, awareness of the necessity of national defence was heightened, especially against attacks from the sea. As a result of this awareness, this fortress was built in the 29th year (1703) of the reign of King Sukjong. The inner and the outer walls were mainly built of natural stones, but weak portions were reinforced with artificially worked square stone blocks. The walls are about 17 kilometers in length and from 1.5 meters to 3 meters in height. The area surrounded by the fortress is about 8.2 square kilometers.

Geumjeongsanseong (literally Geungjeong Mountain Fortress or Geumjeong Fortress) is the largest mountain fortress in the Republic of Korea today. It is located on Geumjeongsan in the Busan Metropolitan City.

Following the Japanese invasion of 1592 and the Manchu invasion in 1627 and again in 1637, awareness of the necessity of national defence was heightened, especially against attacks from the sea. As a result of this awareness, this fortress was built in the 29th year (1703) of the reign of King Sukjong. The inner and the outer walls were mainly built of natural stones, but weak portions were reinforced with artificially worked square stone blocks. The walls are about 17 kilometers in length and from 1.5 meters to 3 meters in height. The area surrounded by the fortress is about 8.2 square kilometers.

It is clear that fortresses had been already built on this site before 1700. Yi Chi-hong, a naval commander, left a record in 1667 in which he mentions traces of an old fortress on the site. The construction of the fortress began in 1701 at the recommendation of Jo Tae-dong, the Governor of Gyeongsang-do, and was completed in 1702. In 1707 the walls were built around the main structure of the fortress. This fortress fell to disuse because it was too large to maintain. After lying empty for a century, it was repaired in 1807, the seventh year of the reign of King Sunjo. Oh Han-won, the Dongnae Magistrate, took the responsibility for building the west gate in 1807, and the other gates the following year. There is a stele recording the building of the gates.

The fortress was destroyed during the Japanese occupation (1910-1945), but began to be restored in 1972. The East, West and South gates were restored by 1974 and the north gate was rebuilt in 1989. Today, thanks to the restoration efforts, much of the walls and the four gates still stand. Of the 4 existing observation towers, the tower number 1 (제1망루) located on the south-west side was destroyed by the typhoon Rusa on the morning of September 1, 2002.[1] The area around the South Gate is a popular resting place. The West Gate, even though it is the most impressive of the four, is the less frequented one due to its lack of accessibility. (by WIKI)

 geumjungsan 87

Geumjung Mt. Fortress

Copy right :  hyleidos

Geumjung sansung Fortress

Geumjeongsanseong Fortress is located on  Mt. Geumjeongsan in Busan. It is the largest fortress in the country and is 17,377 m in length and 3 m high.
It is believed to have been built during the Three Kingdoms Era in 1703, during the reign of Suk-Jong.
One can find spring water easily in the region. There are also rock caves and rock peaks here.
One can reach the fortress from Busan by taking the Busan subway line 1 and getting off at Guseo St. The fortress is at walking distance from Guseo St.  (by  www.holidayiq.com)

Beomeosa (Temple of the Nirvana Fish) is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism in Cheongnyong-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan, South Korea. Built on the slopes of Geumjeongsan, it is one of the country’s leading urban temples. (by WIKI)

Copt right by IndiemmaJones

Beomeosa was constructed in 678 during the reign of Silla king Munmu, by the monk Uisang. It became known as one of the ten great temples of the Hwaeom sect, although like most Korean temples it was later assimilated into the Jogye Order. At its largest, during the Goryeo dynasty, it was much larger than it is today – with over 360 rooms and more than a thousand monks in residence. The temple was burned to the ground in 1592 during the Japanese invasion. It was reconstructed in 1602, but was burned again by an accidental fire. In 1613 it was rebuilt again. The main hall (Daeungjeon) and the front gate (Iljumun) date to this reconstruction.

The mountain where Beomeosa is found is said to have huge rock at the summit where there is a golden well which never, ever dries up. The water of this well is believed to have very special magical properties as one day a golden fish came from heaven and has lived there ever since.

Beom(범;梵) = nirvana – eo(어;魚) = fish – sa(사;寺) = temple.[1] Thus the name of the temple came to be "Heavenly Fish." It is also claimed that the fish came from Nirvana, the Buddhist state of non-suffering. Therefore the temple also became known as "The temple where fish from Nirvana Play."[2]

On December 26, 2011, the Los Angeles Times printed a story of the fighting monks at this temple. South Korean Buddhist monk Ando demonstrates Sunmudo martial arts techniques. Monks from Beomeosa Temple are famed for defeating Japanese invaders during the late 1500s and again during the Japanese occupation of Korea in the early 20th century. (by WIKI)

The music fountain shoots water upto 55m from the ground and displays a choreographed show of water dancing water dancing along with background music. Visitor enjoy a wonderful combination of water, light & music.

World’s biggest floor music fountain

Copy right @ KOREA.NET – Official page of the Republic of Korea

For more information, please leave your message below!

 

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It is clear that fortresses had been already built on this site before 1700. Yi Chi-hong, a naval commander, left a record in 1667 in which he mentions traces of an old fortress on the site. The construction of the fortress began in 1701 at the recommendation of Jo Tae-dong, the Governor of Gyeongsang-do, and was completed in 1702. In 1707 the walls were built around the main structure of the fortress. This fortress fell to disuse because it was too large to maintain. After lying empty for a century, it was repaired in 1807, the seventh year of the reign of King Sunjo. Oh Han-won, the Dongnae Magistrate, took the responsibility for building the west gate in 1807, and the other gates the following year. There is a stele recording the building of the gates.

The fortress was destroyed during the Japanese occupation (1910-1945), but began to be restored in 1972. The East, West and South gates were restored by 1974 and the north gate was rebuilt in 1989. Today, thanks to the restoration efforts, much of the walls and the four gates still stand. Of the 4 existing observation towers, the tower number 1 (제1망루) located on the south-west side was destroyed by the typhoon Rusa on the morning of September 1, 2002.[1] The area around the South Gate is a popular resting place. The West Gate, even though it is the most impressive of the four, is the less frequented one due to its lack of accessibility. (by WIKI)

 geumjungsan 87

Geumjung Mt. Fortress

Copy right :  hyleidos

Geumjung sansung Fortress

Geumjeongsanseong Fortress is located on  Mt. Geumjeongsan in Busan. It is the largest fortress in the country and is 17,377 m in length and 3 m high.
It is believed to have been built during the Three Kingdoms Era in 1703, during the reign of Suk-Jong.
One can find spring water easily in the region. There are also rock caves and rock peaks here.
One can reach the fortress from Busan by taking the Busan subway line 1 and getting off at Guseo St. The fortress is at walking distance from Guseo St.  (by  www.holidayiq.com)

Beomeosa (Temple of the Nirvana Fish) is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism in Cheongnyong-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan, South Korea. Built on the slopes of Geumjeongsan, it is one of the country’s leading urban temples. (by WIKI)

Copt right by IndiemmaJones

Beomeosa was constructed in 678 during the reign of Silla king Munmu, by the monk Uisang. It became known as one of the ten great temples of the Hwaeom sect, although like most Korean temples it was later assimilated into the Jogye Order. At its largest, during the Goryeo dynasty, it was much larger than it is today – with over 360 rooms and more than a thousand monks in residence. The temple was burned to the ground in 1592 during the Japanese invasion. It was reconstructed in 1602, but was burned again by an accidental fire. In 1613 it was rebuilt again. The main hall (Daeungjeon) and the front gate (Iljumun) date to this reconstruction.

The mountain where Beomeosa is found is said to have huge rock at the summit where there is a golden well which never, ever dries up. The water of this well is believed to have very special magical properties as one day a golden fish came from heaven and has lived there ever since.

Beom(범;梵) = nirvana – eo(어;魚) = fish – sa(사;寺) = temple.[1] Thus the name of the temple came to be "Heavenly Fish." It is also claimed that the fish came from Nirvana, the Buddhist state of non-suffering. Therefore the temple also became known as "The temple where fish from Nirvana Play."[2]

On December 26, 2011, the Los Angeles Times printed a story of the fighting monks at this temple. South Korean Buddhist monk Ando demonstrates Sunmudo martial arts techniques. Monks from Beomeosa Temple are famed for defeating Japanese invaders during the late 1500s and again during the Japanese occupation of Korea in the early 20th century. (by WIKI)

The music fountain shoots water upto 55m from the ground and displays a choreographed show of water dancing water dancing along with background music. Visitor enjoy a wonderful combination of water, light & music.

World’s biggest floor music fountain

Copy right @ KOREA.NET – Official page of the Republic of Korea

For more information, please leave your message below!

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

It is clear that fortresses had been already built on this site before 1700. Yi Chi-hong, a naval commander, left a record in 1667 in which he mentions traces of an old fortress on the site. The construction of the fortress began in 1701 at the recommendation of Jo Tae-dong, the Governor of Gyeongsang-do, and was completed in 1702. In 1707 the walls were built around the main structure of the fortress. This fortress fell to disuse because it was too large to maintain. After lying empty for a century, it was repaired in 1807, the seventh year of the reign of King Sunjo. Oh Han-won, the Dongnae Magistrate, took the responsibility for building the west gate in 1807, and the other gates the following year. There is a stele recording the building of the gates.

The fortress was destroyed during the Japanese occupation (1910-1945), but began to be restored in 1972. The East, West and South gates were restored by 1974 and the north gate was rebuilt in 1989. Today, thanks to the restoration efforts, much of the walls and the four gates still stand. Of the 4 existing observation towers, the tower number 1 (제1망루) located on the south-west side was destroyed by the typhoon Rusa on the morning of September 1, 2002.[1] The area around the South Gate is a popular resting place. The West Gate, even though it is the most impressive of the four, is the less frequented one due to its lack of accessibility. (by WIKI)

 geumjungsan 87

Geumjung Mt. Fortress

Copy right :  hyleidos

Geumjung sansung Fortress

Geumjeongsanseong Fortress is located on  Mt. Geumjeongsan in Busan. It is the largest fortress in the country and is 17,377 m in length and 3 m high.
It is believed to have been built during the Three Kingdoms Era in 1703, during the reign of Suk-Jong.
One can find spring water easily in the region. There are also rock caves and rock peaks here.
One can reach the fortress from Busan by taking the Busan subway line 1 and getting off at Guseo St. The fortress is at walking distance from Guseo St.  (by  www.holidayiq.com)

Beomeosa (Temple of the Nirvana Fish) is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism in Cheongnyong-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan, South Korea. Built on the slopes of Geumjeongsan, it is one of the country’s leading urban temples. (by WIKI)

Copt right by IndiemmaJones

Beomeosa was constructed in 678 during the reign of Silla king Munmu, by the monk Uisang. It became known as one of the ten great temples of the Hwaeom sect, although like most Korean temples it was later assimilated into the Jogye Order. At its largest, during the Goryeo dynasty, it was much larger than it is today – with over 360 rooms and more than a thousand monks in residence. The temple was burned to the ground in 1592 during the Japanese invasion. It was reconstructed in 1602, but was burned again by an accidental fire. In 1613 it was rebuilt again. The main hall (Daeungjeon) and the front gate (Iljumun) date to this reconstruction.

The mountain where Beomeosa is found is said to have huge rock at the summit where there is a golden well which never, ever dries up. The water of this well is believed to have very special magical properties as one day a golden fish came from heaven and has lived there ever since.

Beom(범;梵) = nirvana – eo(어;魚) = fish – sa(사;寺) = temple.[1] Thus the name of the temple came to be "Heavenly Fish." It is also claimed that the fish came from Nirvana, the Buddhist state of non-suffering. Therefore the temple also became known as "The temple where fish from Nirvana Play."[2]

On December 26, 2011, the Los Angeles Times printed a story of the fighting monks at this temple. South Korean Buddhist monk Ando demonstrates Sunmudo martial arts techniques. Monks from Beomeosa Temple are famed for defeating Japanese invaders during the late 1500s and again during the Japanese occupation of Korea in the early 20th century. (by WIKI)

The music fountain shoots water upto 55m from the ground and displays a choreographed show of water dancing water dancing along with background music. Visitor enjoy a wonderful combination of water, light & music.

World’s biggest floor music fountain

Copy right @ KOREA.NET – Official page of the Republic of Korea

For more information, please leave your message below!

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]